Coronavirus Update - Contact Details for the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies

The Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies remains dedicated to supporting the campus and public population. We are actively practicing social distancing, which means we remain open for business but we are limiting the number of visitors on campus. If you need to contact the Center, phone (828) 262-2311 or email hillms@appstate.edu.

For university-wide coronavirus information, see App State Coronavirus Information.

Recent Events

Center Lectures, Panels, and Conferences

Center Lectures, Panels, and Conferences

Full-length recordings of past events are available in our on-line holdings

Visual History Archive of the USC Shoah Foundation

Visual History Archive of the USC Shoah Foundation

Full access for ASU students, faculty, staff, and community users registered with the library

News

Center Director Dr. T. Pegelow Kaplan Publishes Co-Edited Volume on Jewish Petitioning during the Shoah

Center Director Dr. T. Pegelow Kaplan Publishes Co-Edited Volume on Jewish Petitioning during the ShoahDr. Thomas Pegelow Kaplan, the Leon Levine Dist...

Racist Attacks Continue at Appalachian State

Racist Attacks Continue at Appalachian StateDuring the July 4 weekend, the car of an Appalachian State University student was covered with swastikas a...

Center Names First Senior JHPS Fellow

 Center Names First Senior JHPS Fellow Last year, the Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies introduced a new program that brings an...

Center Participates in Public Project to Strengthen Democracy and Fight Antisemitism in Germany

Center Participates in Public Project to Strengthen Democracy and Fight Antisemitism in GermanyBefore the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, Center director Dr....

Upcoming Events

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Center Lunch Colloquium: Prof. Amos Goldberg (Jerusalem) on the Holocaust and the Nakba

The Third Center Lunch Colloquium features the influential work by Dr. Amos Goldberg, Associate Professor at the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry and the head of the Research Institute of Contemporary Jewry at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. The ZOOM-based colloquium will take place on Monday, Oct. 19, 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Dr. Goldberg will join us from Jerusalem. The event will focus on his important co-edited (with political theorist Bashir Bashir) collection entitled The Holocaust and the Nakba: A New Grammar of Trauma and History (Columbia University Press 2018). This volume introduces a new and original frame for a productive conversation about the Holocaust and Nakba, the 1948 mass flight and expulsion of Palestinian Arabs. 

Prof. Goldberg is an Israeli cultural historian whose work is interdisciplinary in nature. His studies focus on the history of the Jews in the Holocaust as well as on Holocaust memory and historiography. His many other publications include Trauma in First Person: Diary Writing during the Holocaust (Indiana University Press 2017). He also led and functioned as a co-writer of the four-volume series Years Wherein We Have Seen Evil: Selected Aspects in the History of Religious Jewry during the Holocaust (Yad Vashem).

For more information, to receive the texts for the colloquium and the Zoom access link,  please contact the Center at holocaust@appstate.edu or 828.262.2311.

 

ariel.jpgCenter Events with Prof. Yaakov Ariel (UNC-Chapel Hill) on Evangelical Christians and Jews

The Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies invites the public to an online lecture by Prof. Yaakov Ariel, Carolina Center for Jewish Studies/Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, on Mon., Oct. 26, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. Prof. Ariel's lecture will focus on An Unexpected Enchantment: Evangelical Christians and Jews, also the title of one of his thought-provoking recent books. His lecture will be followed by a Q-and-A. A specialist in Judaism in the Modern World, Prof. Ariel is one of the foremost experts in Evangelical Christianity's attitudes towards the Jewish people and the Holy Land and on Christian-Jewish relations in the late modern era. He has published numerous articles, book chapters and three monographs on these subjects. Prof. Ariel also co-led the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill.

From 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. on the same day, Prof. Ariel's broader work will be featured in the Center's fourth F’20 Lunch Research Colloquium(also on ZOOM). Like all colloquia, it is based on two pre-circulated publications by our guest that all participants will read before the start of the session.

 Like (almost) all Center events, these online programs are free of charge and open to the public. To get the link for either one of these ZOOM meetingscopies of the colloquium texts, and more information about the events, please contact the Center at 828.262.2311 or holocaust@appstate.edu

grossmann_0.jpgProf. Atina Grossmann (Cooper Union, New York) on Jewish Escapes from Europe under Nazi Rule -- In Commemoration of the November 1938 "Kristallnacht" Pogroms

The Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies proudly invites the public to an online lecture by Prof. Atina Grossmann, Professor of History in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Cooper Union in New York City. Her evening lecture is entitled  “Remapping Survival: Jewish Refugees and Lost Memories of Displacement, Trauma, and Rescue in the Soviet Union, Iran, and India” and will start on Monday, November 9, at 7:00 pm. Her talk integrates the largely unexamined experiences and lost memories of displacement and trauma of European Jews who managed to flee to the Far East into our understanding of the Shoah, and to remap the landscape of persecution, survival, relief and rescue during and after World War. The event also marks and commemorates the 82nd anniversary of Kristallnacht, the nationwide pogroms in Hitler Germany that began on November 9, 1938, and marked the prewar turning point in the Nazi regime's persecution of the country's Jewish population.

Prof. Grossmann is a specialist in German-Jewish history, Holocaust Studies, and women's and gender history and the author and co-editor of many path-breaking studies that helped to reshape various academic fields. These works include Jews, Germans, and Allies: Close Encounters in Occupied Germany (2007), Wege in der Fremde: Deutsch-jüdische Begegnungsgeschichte zwischen New York, Berlin und Teheran (2012), and Reforming Sex: The German Movement for Birth Control and Abortion Reform, 1920-1950 (1995) as well as the co-edited volumes on Shelter from the Holocaust: Rethinking Jewish Survival in the Soviet Union (2017), After the Nazi Racial State: Difference and Democracy in Germany and Europe (2009), and When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany (1984). Prof. Grossmann is the daughter of German-Jewish Holocaust survivors.

From 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. on the same day, Prof. Grossmann's broader work will be featured in the Center's final F’20 Lunch Research Colloquium (also on ZOOM). Like all colloquia, it is based on two pre-circulated publications by our guest that all participants will read before the start of the session.

 Like (almost) all Center events, these online programs are free of charge and open to the public. To get the link for either one of these ZOOM meetingscopies of the colloquium texts, and more information about the events, please contact the Center at 828.262.2311 or holocaust@appstate.edu